KC Killoran
Global Product Manager for Servers & Storage
Tags: Servers

5 Questions to Ask Yourself When Selecting Your Next Server

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Often times we don’t efficiently support the servers that we are running. The processor is not robust enough, we don’t install enough memory, or sometimes we don’t consider port count. In order to ensure the best support for the servers in your network, check out these 5 questions everyone should ask themselves when choosing a server.

What type of applications will you be running, and how many?

The server you select depends entirely on the applications you will be running. Applications tend to be very robust. If you don’t have the correct hardware to support the application, you can experience latency, errors, and even worse: downtime. Always refer to each application’s OEM for the hardware requirements that you may need. For companies with many applications (i.e., file, email, CRM and database), you will need a stronger tower, rack, or blade server.

What type of processors do you need, and how many?

When reviewing the type of processors for the server that you want to use, consider the application you are using. In most cases, the application will require a particular type of processor, core, and speed. The last thing you want is to buy a processor that is too powerful—you don’t want to spend money on something you don’t need. Worse yet, you don’t want to get a processor that doesn’t provide a balanced server because it will give you a bottleneck instead. 

What type of switch ports do you need to support the server, and how many?

Customers will sometimes order too many servers only to find that they don’t have enough ports on their switch to plug it into. Remember to do an empty port count in your existing network to see if you need to buy another switch to support your new deployment of servers. Verify that you have enough ports on your switch to meet and support the amount of servers you plan on deploying. 

How much memory do you need?

Let’s face it… when it comes to memory, more is better. It will cost initially, but who wants to take down their network to install and max out the memory on their server when you could have gotten it done on the initial deployment?  It’s best to max out your server with memory to avoid the hassle of taking down your network.  Nobody wants to de-rack and re-rack servers on their weekend. NOBODY.

How much power do you really need?

Finally, calculate how much power you will need for your server so you can get the adequate power supply.  Power consumption—or conservation rather—hot topic in any environment.  Don’t ignore the fact that your server may draw a lot of power depending on the components you install.  Review the power draw per component, and pick based on the needs of your environment.

If you liked what you read in this blog, you might also enjoy: https://www.curvature.com/blog/10-Things-You-May-Not-Know-About-Servers-and-Storage

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